Archive for the ‘Crime’ Category

DRUNKEN DRIVING AMONGST YOUNG

Younger drivers found drinking

 (Steve MacInnis – Cape Breton Post)

 

Sgt. Russell Baker, who heads the Cape Breton Regional Police Service traffic unit, displays an anti-drinking and driving poster, a common sight in most workplaces. But some continue to ignore the message and Baker said they do so at their own risk,…

Published on December 17th, 2010

Published on December 17th, 2010

Steve MacInnis 

Overall charges about steady compared to last year

SYDNEY — Sgt. Russell Baker reviews the year’s statistics for drinking and driving infractions in the Cape Breton Regional Municipality and notices a disturbing pattern.

Topics :

RCMP , Cape Breton , Nova Scotia

“Charges against those aged 35 and under are becoming more prevalent,” the veteran Cape Breton Regional Police officer said.

Overall, statistics are about steady. In 2009, there were 171 charges of impaired driving filed and so far this year, 166 individuals have been charged.

But Baker said it is surprising that younger drivers are increasingly getting caught drinking and driving, given that age group would have been bombarded with anti-drinking-and-driving campaigns during their school years.

He didn’t have any hard numbers on the amount of younger drivers being charged with impaired driving, but said police have noticed a pattern emerging.

And the number of charges doesn’t seem to be dropping since last year. “Since Dec. 1, we’ve charged 13 persons, which is really quite disturbing,” Baker said.

So, what’s the problem? Why aren’t people getting the message to not drink and drive.

“I guess they just don’t feel it would happen to them (getting nabbed by police),” said Baker.

“Charges against those aged 35 and under are becoming more prevalent.” – Cape Breton Regional Police Sgt. Russell Baker

See ‘Fallout’ page A2

But getting caught can happen to anyone at anytime and Baker said he hears the same comment every time.

“‘I know I shouldn’t have done it. I am some stupid,’” he said.

The fallout from an impaired charge should be enough to scare most drivers.

There is always potential for loss of life or serious injury, which should be the main reason not to get behind the wheel intoxicated.

But Baker also said a conviction means no licence for one year, which for some could mean finding a new job. It also results in fines that average about $1,500, and insurance rates soar and remain high for at least five years.

Then, said Baker, there is the matter of incurring a criminal record, which could prevent an individual from traveling internationally.

(But for the Grace of God go I not so long ago – CAPER)

“Have a safe and accident free Holiday Season”

MACINTOSH TAKES THE STAND

MacIntosh in the Custody of the RCMP

MacIntosh takes witness stand in his own defence

 

Developing story

Published on December 13th, 2010

Published on December 13th, 2010

(Nancy King  Cape Breton Post)

Editor’s note: Some readers may be offended by the content of this story.

Topics :

Nova Scotia Supreme Court , Registry of Motor Vehicles , PORT HAWKESBURY , Halifax , Guysborough

PORT HAWKESBURY — Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh told a Nova Scotia Supreme Court justice Monday that he had consensual sexual contact with two of the men he stands accused of abusing in the 1970s when they were teens.

The testimony came on the fifth day of MacIntosh’s trial on charges of indecent assault and gross indecency, as he took the witness stand in his own defence.

Under questioning by his lawyer David Bright, MacIntosh, 67, denied ever taking the first complainant on a trip to Halifax, as the court heard earlier. He said he did take the man, who is now 53, on a boat trip with another man to a summer festival in Guysborough shortly before the man turned 18, at least a year later than is alleged. MacIntosh said it’s possible the man spent the second night there at a home in Boylston, but denied entering his room and performing oral sex on him.

“That is not truthful,” MacIntosh said, adding he’s sure he never stayed at that home.

He said they returned to Port Hawkesbury by boat rather than car, as the man had testified, and he performed oral sex on the man aboard the boat, adding the contact was consensual.

On cross-examination by Crown attorney Alicia Kennedy, MacIntosh said he spent a lot of time with the man and knew his father, but denied knowing that the man had left home in his mid-teens, becoming a ward of the county.

“You say that you spent a lot of time with him but you didn’t know anything at all about his personal circumstances?” Kennedy asked.

There were other consensual sexual encounters with the complainant within the next several weeks aboard the boat and at the rooming house that MacIntosh co-owned, he said. He said the complainant showed him that he preferred to have anal sex by turning his bare buttocks toward him, but Macintosh “was not interested.” MacIntosh said they continued to have contact after that incident.

“As you allege, (the man) would have wanted more from you than you were willing to give,” Kennedy said.

“From a sexual perspective, you’re right, he may have wanted more than I was prepared to get involved in, but that was not the basis of our relationship,” MacIntosh said.

The second complainant was the son of good friends, MacIntosh said. He testified that he didn’t know much about the man, although he knew that he was gay. He said that in mid-1973, as he came home to the apartment building where he lived one evening, he saw the man in the parking lot and he invited him inside. There, MacIntosh said, the man performed oral sex on him.

Kennedy asked why MacIntosh would invite the man inside if he didn’t know him very well.

“Obviously he was at my place, came to the parking lot, and why shouldn’t I invite him in?” he said.

They had other sexual encounters at the apartment, MacIntosh said. While MacIntosh said the man continued to visit him after he moved into the rooming house, he said there was no sexual contact between the two there, because he preferred to be discreet.

MacIntosh denied having any sexual contact with the third complainant, saying he could “barely recollect,” him. The man earlier testified that he was about 10 when MacIntosh touched his penis.

MacIntosh said he wouldn’t have taken any of the complainants with him during visits to his mother’s home, as the court heard earlier in the trial, because he had left home at age 14 because his stepfather was violent. He said he did not return to that home until his stepfather was dying of cancer in 1984.

Under cross-examination, MacIntosh acknowledged he maintained a good relationship with his mother, and visited her many times, but not at her home.

The defence also presented records from the Registry of Motor Vehicles in an effort to confirm what vehicles MacIntosh owned between 1978 and 1984, to support his version of the events.

Kennedy noted the list was not complete because it didn’t include a Mercedes that MacIntosh leased in 1981. MacIntosh replied that that vehicle was leased under his company’s name, Fentronics.

Chief Justice Joseph Kennedy said he intends to set a date in January when he will rule on the charges.

RCMP DUMP ON SPEEDERS

RCMP cracking down on speeding on newly-twinned highway

New Twinned Highway (Part of 125) Attract Speeders 

 

Published on December 11th, 2010

Published on December 11th, 2010

Staff ~ The Cape Breton Post 

SYDNEY — If you’re looking to test out the newly-twinned Highway 125 between Balls Creek and Sydney River by putting the pedal to the metal, think again.

Topics :

RCMP

The RCMP has stepped up their patrols along the highway since it opened, Dec. 4. They’ve written 40 offence tickets, 30 of which have been for speeding.

Cpl. Ron MacDonald of the RCMP Cape Breton Traffic Services said the new road is safer, straight and well built, but felt they should step up patrols in case people were tempted to cruise at high speeds.

“We figured we should be out there and become visible right away and I’m glad we did,” he said. “We could tell there were going to be some speeds and right away, doing a couple of speed enforcement operations, we wrote as many as 30 speeding tickets and probably 10 other tickets for a variety of things.

“That was realistically in a matter of four hours in total that we wrote those 40 tickets.”

MacDonald said the speed limit is 100 km/h and he would like to see motorists do that speed or less with some construction still taking place.

“These next couple of weeks there’s going to be high volumes of traffic,” he said. “The key is to slow down, drive for the conditions and be safe.”

(Just looking at this new section of 125 makes me think how we could have used that back in the days of boot legging coal – the Coal Cops would never have been able to get turned and catch us. – CAPER)

MACINTOSH FACES MORE CHARGES

Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh trial begins today

 

MacIntosh Trial Begins Today

Published on December 6th, 2010

The Canadian Press 

PORT HAWKESBURY — A trial on a second set of charges begins today in Port Hawkesbury for a former businessman accused of molesting boys in the 1970s.

Topics :

RCMP , Halifax , Canada , India

Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh, 67, is charged with gross indecency and indecent assault.

MacIntosh was convicted in July of 13 counts of indecent assault and gross indecency involving another two complainants.

He was sentenced to four years in prison but was given credit for his two years in remand, leaving him only two years less a day to serve.

MacIntosh was granted bail in October and placed under house arrest at his Halifax apartment while he awaits an appeal in May of the conviction.

More than 15 years have passed since RCMP received complaints from men that they were sexually abused by MacIntosh as boys in Cape Breton.

By the time the men came forward with their allegations, MacIntosh had left Canada to set up a business and residence in India. He was extradited in 2007.

Three complainants testified in July that MacIntosh fondled and performed oral sex on them when they were between 11 and 14 years old.

The judge rejected the testimony of one of the now middle-aged men and found MacIntosh not guilty of 13 charges involving him.

(If we had a more equitable Justice System he would be in Prison Fatiques and Leg Irons and cuffs. Instead he looks as good or better then the Judge – CAPER)

WASHINGTON – DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH

Dangers of Living in WASHDC

 

U.S. Combat Soldier in Iraq

An interesting letter in the Australian Shooter Magazine this week, which
I quote:  

 

“If you consider that there has been an average of
160,000 troops in the Iraq theatre of operations during the past 22 months, resulting in  a total of 2112 deaths, that gives a firearm death rate of 60 per 100,000 soldiers.

Compare this to the firearm death rate in Washington, DC which is 80.6 per 100,000 for the same period of time – 22 months – that means you are about 25 percent more likely to be shot and killed in the U.S. capital, which by the way has some of the strictest gun control laws in the U.S., than you are as a combat soldier serving in Iraq.

Which means:  “The U.S. should pull out of Washington.”

Car Park Gun Fight – One Man Killed by Gunfire 

COKE BUST NETS SIXTEEN

Typical Drug Bust – Evidence

Individuals facing charges in cocaine crackdown make court appearances

 (Courtesy Cape Breton Post)

Published on November 1st, 2010

Published on November 1st, 2010

Steve MacInnis

SYDNEY — Accused charged earlier this year in a cocaine crackdown made court appearances Monday.

Topics :

RCMP-Cape Breton Regional Police investigation , Howie Centre , Sydney , Cape Breton , Montreal

The joint RCMP-Cape Breton Regional Police investigation nabbed 16 suspects along with more than $100,000 in property deemed to have been purchased with the proceeds from illegal drug sales.

Operation H-Tactic saw police seize vehicles, televisions, a backhoe, along with a washer and dryer.

At the time of the raids, police reported that the bust was also the first time organized crime related charges were filed in Cape Breton. However, neither police nor prosecutors were immediately available Monday to offer an update on the seizure of items along with offering an explanation as to why none of the accused who appeared in court Monday were formally charged with participating in a criminal organization.

A total of 50 officers from both policing agencies were involved in the operation.

Those who appeared in court Monday include:

Matthew Charles Cook, 24, Sydney, who is charged with 10 counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; three counts of possession of stolen goods and a single count of trafficking in cocaine. Cook is scheduled to enter pleas on the charges Dec. 5. He is also scheduled back in court Thursday for a bail hearing. He has been on remand since his arrest.

Nadine Louise Cameron, 35, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy and single counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine and with trafficking in the same drug. She is scheduled to appear back in court Dec. 1 to enter pleas.

Aaron Curtis Mickey, 31, Sydney, is charged with conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas Nov. 22.

Vincent Joseph Mombourquette, 23, Sydney, is charged with nine counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; two counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine and two counts of trafficking in marijuana and cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Nov. 25 to set a preliminary hearing on the charges. He continues to be on remand at the Cape Breton Correctional Centre.

James Andrew Maclean, 22, Sydney, is charged with three counts of trafficking in cocaine; three counts of conspiracy to traffic and a single count of trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas to the charges Dec. 2.

Damion David Wilson, 32, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and a single count of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas to the charges Dec. 2.

Daniel Clarke Hynes, 25, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic; and single counts of possession, possession for the purpose of trafficking and trafficking, all relating to cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 1 to enter pleas.

An arrest warrant remains in effect for Michael William Giordano, 43, Montreal, who is charged with conspiracy to traffic in steroids.

Kyle James Kabatay, 22, Sydney, is charged with four counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and marijuana and three counts of breaching court orders. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 2 to enter pleas. He continues on remand at the correctional centre.

Aimee Lynn Graham, 29, Howie Centre, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and a single count of trafficking in cocaine.

Sarah Danielle Steele, 20, of Sydney, is charged with three counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; two counts of trafficking in marijuana and single counts of trafficking in pot and theft. She is scheduled back in court Nov. 20 to enter pleas.

Jonathan David MacCoy, 21, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 2 to enter pleas.

Matthew Gerrard Wall, 23, Dartmouth, is charged with conspiracy to traffic in marijuana and is scheduled back in court Nov. 23 to enter a plea.

Robert Lloyd Leblanc, 30, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy and single counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking and with trafficking. Both deal with cocaine.

MACINTOSH GRANTED BAIL

MacIntosh granted bail during appeal

MacIntosh Leaving Court

 

 
By THE CANADIAN PRESS
Thu, Oct 7 – 1:23 PM

 

A former Nova Scotia businessman has been granted bail while he appeals his convictions for molesting two boys in the 1970s.

Justice Joel Fichaud of the Nova Court of Appeal ruled today that 67-year-old Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh would be under house arrest at his residence in Halifax, and permitted brief outings for his medical appointments and to purchase groceries.

MacIntosh must also put up $60,000 and a property he owns in Port Hawkesbury as surety while he waits for his appeal to be heard, which is set for May 10.

The former telecommunications executive has been in jail since July 20 when he was convicted by a Nova Scotia Supreme Court justice of 13 charges of indecent assault and gross indecency.

In September, Justice Simon MacDonald gave him a four-year sentence, calling the crimes “repugnant” and saying it was important to send the message that society abhors the abuse of children.

MacIntosh received two years’ credit for his time in remand, leaving him only two years less a day to serve on his sentence.

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