Archive for the ‘Crime’ Category

MACINTOSH FACES MORE CHARGES

Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh trial begins today

 

MacIntosh Trial Begins Today

Published on December 6th, 2010

The Canadian Press 

PORT HAWKESBURY — A trial on a second set of charges begins today in Port Hawkesbury for a former businessman accused of molesting boys in the 1970s.

Topics :

RCMP , Halifax , Canada , India

Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh, 67, is charged with gross indecency and indecent assault.

MacIntosh was convicted in July of 13 counts of indecent assault and gross indecency involving another two complainants.

He was sentenced to four years in prison but was given credit for his two years in remand, leaving him only two years less a day to serve.

MacIntosh was granted bail in October and placed under house arrest at his Halifax apartment while he awaits an appeal in May of the conviction.

More than 15 years have passed since RCMP received complaints from men that they were sexually abused by MacIntosh as boys in Cape Breton.

By the time the men came forward with their allegations, MacIntosh had left Canada to set up a business and residence in India. He was extradited in 2007.

Three complainants testified in July that MacIntosh fondled and performed oral sex on them when they were between 11 and 14 years old.

The judge rejected the testimony of one of the now middle-aged men and found MacIntosh not guilty of 13 charges involving him.

(If we had a more equitable Justice System he would be in Prison Fatiques and Leg Irons and cuffs. Instead he looks as good or better then the Judge – CAPER)

WASHINGTON – DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH

Dangers of Living in WASHDC

 

U.S. Combat Soldier in Iraq

An interesting letter in the Australian Shooter Magazine this week, which
I quote:  

 

“If you consider that there has been an average of
160,000 troops in the Iraq theatre of operations during the past 22 months, resulting in  a total of 2112 deaths, that gives a firearm death rate of 60 per 100,000 soldiers.

Compare this to the firearm death rate in Washington, DC which is 80.6 per 100,000 for the same period of time – 22 months – that means you are about 25 percent more likely to be shot and killed in the U.S. capital, which by the way has some of the strictest gun control laws in the U.S., than you are as a combat soldier serving in Iraq.

Which means:  “The U.S. should pull out of Washington.”

Car Park Gun Fight – One Man Killed by Gunfire 

COKE BUST NETS SIXTEEN

Typical Drug Bust – Evidence

Individuals facing charges in cocaine crackdown make court appearances

 (Courtesy Cape Breton Post)

Published on November 1st, 2010

Published on November 1st, 2010

Steve MacInnis

SYDNEY — Accused charged earlier this year in a cocaine crackdown made court appearances Monday.

Topics :

RCMP-Cape Breton Regional Police investigation , Howie Centre , Sydney , Cape Breton , Montreal

The joint RCMP-Cape Breton Regional Police investigation nabbed 16 suspects along with more than $100,000 in property deemed to have been purchased with the proceeds from illegal drug sales.

Operation H-Tactic saw police seize vehicles, televisions, a backhoe, along with a washer and dryer.

At the time of the raids, police reported that the bust was also the first time organized crime related charges were filed in Cape Breton. However, neither police nor prosecutors were immediately available Monday to offer an update on the seizure of items along with offering an explanation as to why none of the accused who appeared in court Monday were formally charged with participating in a criminal organization.

A total of 50 officers from both policing agencies were involved in the operation.

Those who appeared in court Monday include:

Matthew Charles Cook, 24, Sydney, who is charged with 10 counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; three counts of possession of stolen goods and a single count of trafficking in cocaine. Cook is scheduled to enter pleas on the charges Dec. 5. He is also scheduled back in court Thursday for a bail hearing. He has been on remand since his arrest.

Nadine Louise Cameron, 35, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy and single counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine and with trafficking in the same drug. She is scheduled to appear back in court Dec. 1 to enter pleas.

Aaron Curtis Mickey, 31, Sydney, is charged with conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas Nov. 22.

Vincent Joseph Mombourquette, 23, Sydney, is charged with nine counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; two counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine and two counts of trafficking in marijuana and cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Nov. 25 to set a preliminary hearing on the charges. He continues to be on remand at the Cape Breton Correctional Centre.

James Andrew Maclean, 22, Sydney, is charged with three counts of trafficking in cocaine; three counts of conspiracy to traffic and a single count of trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas to the charges Dec. 2.

Damion David Wilson, 32, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and a single count of possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine. He is scheduled to enter pleas to the charges Dec. 2.

Daniel Clarke Hynes, 25, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic; and single counts of possession, possession for the purpose of trafficking and trafficking, all relating to cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 1 to enter pleas.

An arrest warrant remains in effect for Michael William Giordano, 43, Montreal, who is charged with conspiracy to traffic in steroids.

Kyle James Kabatay, 22, Sydney, is charged with four counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and marijuana and three counts of breaching court orders. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 2 to enter pleas. He continues on remand at the correctional centre.

Aimee Lynn Graham, 29, Howie Centre, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine and a single count of trafficking in cocaine.

Sarah Danielle Steele, 20, of Sydney, is charged with three counts of conspiracy to traffic in illegal drugs; two counts of trafficking in marijuana and single counts of trafficking in pot and theft. She is scheduled back in court Nov. 20 to enter pleas.

Jonathan David MacCoy, 21, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy to traffic in cocaine. He is scheduled back in court Dec. 2 to enter pleas.

Matthew Gerrard Wall, 23, Dartmouth, is charged with conspiracy to traffic in marijuana and is scheduled back in court Nov. 23 to enter a plea.

Robert Lloyd Leblanc, 30, Sydney, is charged with two counts of conspiracy and single counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking and with trafficking. Both deal with cocaine.

MACINTOSH GRANTED BAIL

MacIntosh granted bail during appeal

MacIntosh Leaving Court

 

 
By THE CANADIAN PRESS
Thu, Oct 7 – 1:23 PM

 

A former Nova Scotia businessman has been granted bail while he appeals his convictions for molesting two boys in the 1970s.

Justice Joel Fichaud of the Nova Court of Appeal ruled today that 67-year-old Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh would be under house arrest at his residence in Halifax, and permitted brief outings for his medical appointments and to purchase groceries.

MacIntosh must also put up $60,000 and a property he owns in Port Hawkesbury as surety while he waits for his appeal to be heard, which is set for May 10.

The former telecommunications executive has been in jail since July 20 when he was convicted by a Nova Scotia Supreme Court justice of 13 charges of indecent assault and gross indecency.

In September, Justice Simon MacDonald gave him a four-year sentence, calling the crimes “repugnant” and saying it was important to send the message that society abhors the abuse of children.

MacIntosh received two years’ credit for his time in remand, leaving him only two years less a day to serve on his sentence.

DR HALL – FIVE YEARS FOR MURDERING WIFE

 Dr. Hall sentenced to five years for murdering his wife.

Dr. Steven Hall (Halifax) and Isabel Hall (Sydney River)

DANVILLE, Ky. — A former Nova Scotia doctor convicted second-degree manslaughter in the death of his wife in Kentucky last year has been sentenced to five years in prison.

Topics :

Boyle County Detention Center , Dalhousie University , Herrington Lake , Kentucky , Halifax

Boyle Circuit Judge Darren Peckler followed a jury’s recommendation in sentencing Dr. Steven Hall today. Hall ran over his wife, Sydney native Isabel Hall, with a pontoon boat on Herrington Lake in May 2009, as the couple was celebrating its 21st wedding anniversary. She died as a result of deep chop wounds to her head and left arm.

The jury had recommended Hall serve five years after it convicted him in August. The ruling came after a six day trial. Five years was the minimum sentence possible under Kentucky state law.

Hall, has been held at the Boyle County Detention Center since his arrest in May 2009. He will get receive credit for the 495 days he has served to date and will be eligible for his first parole hearing in three to six weeks.

(He will be out by next fishing season – CAPER)

Hall’s lawyer is expected to file a notice of appeal in the case.

Hall is originally from Halifax and a graduate of Dalhousie University medical school.

Commonwealth attorney Richie Bottoms was quoted in August as indicating he was satisfied with the jury’s sentence recommendation.

Hall did not take the stand during his trial, but the jury heard recordings of three separate police interviews lasting more than two hours. He repeatedly said his wife’s death was an accident before admitting to some incriminating actions at the end.

On the tapes, Hall said he made an inappropriate remark about another woman’s breasts, sending his wife into a rage. She attacked him, clawed and bit his back, and he pushed her overboard.

She was in the water in front of the boat screaming, “Help. He’s trying to kill me,” when he ran over her, Hall admitted to police. He maintained that he was going to help her but ran her over accidentally.

(Courtesy of Cape Breton Post – October 5, 2010)

MACINTOSH GETS FOUR YEARS IN SLAMMER

MacIntosh gets four years
Joyce MacDonald

 

 

Fenwick MacIntosh

 

      Former Port Hawkesbury businessman Fenwick MacIntosh was sentenced to four years in provincial prison yesterday. In July MacIntosh was found guilty on 13 counts of indecent assault and gross indecency, relating to sexual offenses committed against two underage boys in Port Hawkesbury in 1973 and 1974. The boys were ten and twelve years old at the time.

MacIntosh has already served just over two years of that time while awaiting trial and sentencing.

“I can’t speak to people’s reactions but certainly the Crown tried to put the position before the court that this type of offending does call for a strong impact,” said Michelle Kennedy, lawyer for the Crown.

MacIntosh’s defence had suggested that a sentence of about two years would be appropriate, less time already served. That would have meant that MacIntosh would be able to walk away from the court room. The Crown had asked for a term of eight years, less time already served, which would not include the time spent waiting extradition in India.

“I think the four year sentence is the longest that’s been handed out in Nova Scotia history for an offence of this kind,” said defence lawyer Brian Casey. “I’m also disappointed that there was not credit given for the particularly harsh circumstances of his remand. But Mr. MacIntosh is in pretty good spirits.”

MacIntosh had to spend time in solitary confinement for his own protection, was put in double bunking in Burnside and was beaten up during his time in prison.

Judge Simon MacDonald said he had to consider the suffering of MacIntosh’s victims in assigning the sentence, as well as sending a message of deterrence to others.

Dr. Angela Connors, a clinical and forensic psychologist, testified that, after a two-day risk assessment session that included a clinical interview, personality tests and a penile plethysmograph (PPG), she would classify MacIntosh as a low to moderate risk to re-offend. She said MacIntosh is not currently a good candidate for treatment, as he continues to deny that he abused the boys and intends to appeal.

“If he wanted to acknowledge responsibility for the offenses he’s been found guilty of, he’s really in a position where he can’t do that,” she said. “If that were not an issue, Mr. MacIntosh doesn’t have the profile of a person who would be amenable to treatment. He would find change difficult.”

She said MacIntosh has some narcissistic tendencies, but is neither a narcissist or a psychopath.

The Crown and the defence agreed that MacIntosh should have a DNA sample on record, as well as a lifetime firearm ban. The judge decided not to add MacIntosh to the sex offender registry or place him under an order restricting him from being in public places around children.

(Courtesy of the Inverness Oran)

BISHOP LAHEY TRIAL – APR 26, 2011

Lawyers to present pretrial motions Nov. 22 in bishop’s child porn case

 

Himself – In Better Times

News Update

OTTAWA — Lawyers have agreed to present pretrial motions Nov. 22 in the child-pornography case involving Roman Catholic Bishop Raymond Lahey.

Topics :

Ottawa , Antigonish , Mount Cashel

Prosecution and defence lawyers appeared briefly in front of a judge today and confirmed Lahey’s trial will proceed next April 26.

It is expected to last two weeks.

Lahey was charged in September 2009 with possessing and importing child pornography, 10 days after he was detained at Ottawa airport as he arrived from Britain.

The 70-year-old bishop, who stepped down as head of the Catholic diocese in Antigonish, N.S., has been staying with other priests in Ottawa since he was granted bail in October 2009.

Police say they found hundreds of files and dozens of videos on Lahey’s laptop, many of them showing young males engaged in sex acts.

Lahey is also fighting claims of sexual assault made in a civil lawsuit filed by Todd Boland in Newfoundland.

The former Mount Cashel resident has accused Lahey in court documents of simulated anal intercourse, sexual rubbing and fondling in the 1980s.

None of the allegations has been proven in court, and no related criminal charges have been filed.

Lahey has denied the claims.

(Cape Breton Post)

NORTH SYDNEY DRUG BUST

Police make record drug bust

 

Chief Myles Burke, right, and Deputy Chief Peter MacIsaac of the Cape Breton Regional Police talk about the largest single cocaine seizure in the department’s history during a press conference, Tuesday.

( Steve Wadden – Cape Breton Post)

Estimated $1.5M worth of cocaine seized after man arrested on ferry

SYDNEY — A suspected cocaine courier was arrested in North Sydney while attempting to cross the Northumberland Strait en route to Newfoundland and Labrador.

Topics :

Marine Atlantic Caribou , Sydney hotel , Cape Breton Correctional Centre , Manitoba , Sydney , Ontario

William Jack Rogers Reardon, a 28-year-old from Manitoba, had seven kilograms of pure cocaine in his backpack when Cape Breton Regional Police nabbed him at the Marine Atlantic Caribou ferry Monday afternoon.

The drugs he carried have an estimated minimum street value of $1.5 million.

“If this is cut or stepped on several times, the value keeps going up,” said Chief Myles Burke.

“Really, thousands of people this would impact. In terms of the damage and destruction to lives, I mean it is hard to calculate.”

Police displayed the bags cocaine to the media at their headquarters Tuesday while the accused was being charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking in cocaine in provincial court in downtown Sydney.

“Our initial investigation has indicated the individual in the investigation is connected to a larger criminal organization based in Ontario, but with links in other parts of this country.”

The accused had spent several days in the local area before boarding the ferry.

Police drug and street crime units are now interviewing locals. No other arrests have yet been made.

The $1.5-million value of the seized drugs more than doubles a 2008 bust at a Sydney hotel valued at more than $600,000.

Not only was the seizure the largest in the history of the local force, Burke said it could also be the largest in Atlantic Canada.

“This arrest, this drug seizure has eliminated a substantial amount of drugs destined for the streets in our province or other provinces. This will disrupt organized drug trafficking with organized crime in our province and others.”

Police said the arrest was made without incident in co-operation with Marine Atlantic.

The accused has been remanded to the Cape Breton Correctional Centre until his bail hearing Friday.

(gmcneil@cbpost.com)

DR HALL GUILTY PT V

Jury finds Hall guilty of second-degree manslaughter

 

Dr. Steven Hall, centre, listens to the jury’s sentence recommendations in his murder trial at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, Ky., Wednesday. He is flanked by his defence team, attorneys Greg Simms (background) and Steve Romines (foreground).

By Todd Kleffman — Danville Advocate-Messenger

DANVILLE, Ky. — One day after being convicted of second-degree manslaughter in his wife’s death, Dr. Steven Hall won a lesser victory from jurors Wednesday when they recommended he serve five years in prison, the minimum sentence possible under Kentucky state law.

Topics :

Dalhousie University , Boyle County Detention Centre , Sydney River , Halifax , Herrington Lake

Ten of 12 jurors declined to comment to reporters about finding Hall guilty of manslaughter in the May 2009 death of his wife Isabel Hall, formerly of Sydney River, or their sentencing decision. The other two jurors could not be located for comment.

Hall also declined comment after the court proceedings on the advice of his attorney Steve Romines, who said he will appeal the case.

Boyle Circuit Judge Darren Peckler will formally sentence Hall, originally from Halifax and a graduate of Dalhousie University medical school, on Oct. 5.

He will be eligible for his first parole hearing shortly thereafter because he has already served 15 months in jail.

Romines said his client is a “strong candidate” for parole from the state’s overcrowded prison system.

Hall was returned Wednesday morning to the Boyle County Detention Centre, where he has remained since his arrest.

Commonwealth’s attorney Richie Bottoms said Wednesday he was satisfied with the jury’s sentence recommendation.

“You have to respect the judgment of the citizens of this community,” he said.

Jurors listened to six days of testimony and deliberated for about 11 hours before convicting Hall of manslaughter just before midnight Tuesday.

He ran over his wife, killing Isabel Hall with a pontoon boat on Herrington Lake on May 29, 2009, as the couple was celebrating its 21st wedding anniversary. She died as a result of deep chop wounds to her head and left arm.

Hall reacted to the verdict as he has through most of his murder trial, with little outward emotion. He appeared ready to talk to a reporter but was whisked out of the courtroom by deputies before he could speak.

Romines said he plans to appeal the verdict and told Hall’s family and friends afterward, “We’re not done fighting. This is just the first step.”

He said he will file a notice of appeal as soon as the court record in the matter has been certified.

Romines said he will appeal because he believes Hall is not guilty. He also hopes to gain an acquittal at a new trial, which would allow Hall to continue practising medicine.

Though he never took the stand, Hall turned out to be perhaps the prosecution’s best witness.

In three separate police interviews lasting more than two hours, Hall repeatedly said his wife’s death was an accident before admitting to some incriminating actions at the end.

On the tapes, Hall said he made an inappropriate remark about another woman’s breasts, sending his wife into a rage. She attacked him, clawed and bit his back, and he pushed her overboard.

She was in the water in front of the boat screaming, “Help. He’s trying to kill me,” when he ran over her, Hall admitted to police. Although he maintained to the end that he was going to help her but ran her over accidentally.

Jurors also asked to see a video of testimony given by former Northpoint prison inmate Dwayne McMullen, who was fishing from the bank about 100 feet away and saw the boat strike Isabel Hall.

McMullen testified he didn’t hear her scream “He’s going to kill me,” but he said, “It looked to me like he took the boat and ran Mrs. Hall over.”

(tkleffman@amnews.com)

(PLEASE NOTE: YOU WILL HAVE TO CONTINUE TO CHECK MY BLOG FOR DAILY INPUT – IF ANY – BECAUSE AT PRESENT I AM UNABLE TO SEND E-MAILS BUT I CAN INPUT MY DATA INTO BLOG AND IF YOU CHECK IT YOU CAN READ IT. THANKS FOR YOUR PATIENCE. CAPER)

DR HALL’S MURDER TRIAL PT IV

Steven and Isabel Hall

Jury hard at work

Though they’ve barely had time to finish their Arby’s lunches, jurors have just requested to listen to all three of Hall’s statements to police, which were played last week and last more than two hours.

Judge Peckler has ordered listening equipment to be set up in the jury room.

“You all must eat faster than me. I hadn’t even finished my lunch yet,” he told jurors.

International news

There apparently is at least modest interest in this case in Canada. All of the Advocate’s stories about the trial have been picked up The Cape Breton Post in Sydney River, where Isabel Hall is from. I did a radio interview this morning with a radio station in Hallifax, where Dr. Hall comes from, and I’m scheduled to a Skype video interview in about an hour with the Canadian Broadcast Corp. TV affiliate in Hallifax.

Hallifax is the  capital of Nova Scotia, the Canadian province that lies just north of Maine. Sydney River is also in Nova Scotia, about four hours from Hallifax.

The excused juror

After closing arguments completed, Circuit Clerk Joni Terry pulled out the name of a lucky — or maybe unlucky in this case — juror who will not be involved in deciding the case. Thirteen jurors sat in the jury box and listened to the entire case, but only 12 are needed to decided, so one of them had to go.

Darrin Farr was the winner, though he said afterward he’s rather be in the jury room figuring things out. He did not offer his opinion on whether he thinks Dr. Steven Hall is innocent or guilty of murder, manslaughter or reckless homicide, which are the choices the jury is mulling over.

“I know how I perceived everything. It would be interesting to see how everyone else perceived it,” Farr said.

Interestingly, Farr shook hands with both the defense and prosecution teams, and the with Dr. Hall himself.

“That was a lot of work for nothing,” Hall told Farr.

For what it’s worth, Farr predicted the jury would not be out very long.

The jury’s out

Jur0rs got the case at 12:30 p.m. and are currently eating lunch in the jury room as they begin sorting out their thoughts.

Closing arguments to begin

Romines said closing arguments will begin shortly. Hurry and get your seat.

Defense rests

Lipian has finished questioning from Richie Bottoms and Romines has announced the defense has rested its case.

Romines said yesterday that he hoped to call an expert on police interrogation techniques but Bottoms had objected to the relevancy of such a witness in the case at hand. Apparently, Judge Darren Peckler has sided with Bottoms, since Lipian was Dr. Hall’s last witness.

The boat expert

Henry Lipian, a Coast Guard veteran and boat accident reconstruction expert from Ohio, has just completed direct examination from defense attorney Steve Romines.

Lipian told the jury that he does not believe Isabel Hall’s injuries were caused by the boat’s propellor. The  pontoon’s sponson (the long tube structures that keep the boat afloat), spray guards, aluminum undergirding and prop guard are all “aggressive pieces of aluminun” that he believes caused the facial and arm wounds that killed Isabel Hall.

Lipian also said there is a  blind spot in front of the Hall’s pontoon that would have prevented Steven Hall from seeing Isabel Hall swimming 10 to 15 feet in front of the boat from the pilot’s seat.

If the boat was traveling at 5 mph and Isabel Hall was 10 to 15 feet in front, there would have been no way for Dr. Hall to have stopped the boat before striking his wife. “Impact was unavoidable,” he said.

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