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George T Fraser….Home Atlast…

GEORGE THOMAS FRASER

MCIT,OMM,CD,LCDR,RCN(RETIRED)

Brighton Ont.

Born Alder point N.S

June 15 1934   Passed   July 18 2011

Leaving home at the age of 14 with only enough money to get to Toronto he joined the Merchant ships sailing the great lakes.

Saving his money he bought his own truck to haul wood and rock at 16, and began a trucking business. He explained that was one of his prouder moments to own his own business.

Moving on quickly he joined the Royal Canadian Navy and began a career as a seamen rising to the rank of Lieutenant Commander in a 28 year career with his wife Carmen by his side. Twenty eight moves in twenty eight years.

Retiring   from the military still a young man, George quickly was employed again .This time in his second love, the sports industry.    Landing a job with the Canadian Games, as the Managing Director. Traveling from Vancouver to New Brunswick   to carry out  his  role. Living in New Brunswick  landed George a job with the trucking industry with Brookville transport, as their director of safety. Something that George seemed to have a great passion for! Safety and trucks.

This new job made George a shoe in for the insurance industry and soon he was working for Boreal insurance as there loss prevention manager for the trucking end of things. Forced to retire at 65 he decided to go on alone and started FCA ( Fraser Consulting Agency) . He became a leader in the trucking industry for loss prevention and  trucking safety.

Working  closely with quite a few trucking companies George began to work solely for Sharp Transportation and there owner and close friend Shawn  Baird .

Able to work from home George was able to research  and write  many books on family history, his love for family and his roots. Also writing a book on Alder Point Nova Scotia.  Cape Breton Island his first love, and where he longed to be. As if he was  not busy enough , he started and maintained a blog called Cape Breton news which gave everyone a chance to stay in touch with what was going on back home.

He was a very busy man right up till the very end.

I’m sure where ever he may be now he is having a cup of boiled tea and lobster tail.

Pre-deceased by,  Mother Viola   Father Simon.

Survived by his wife of 56 years Carmen (Mcneil) Fraser 

Sisters, Shirley Cahill, Mina MacLennan, Judy Macready, Ginny Laffin, Marilyn Broderick , Eleanor Shaw.

Brothers  Simon and Derrick.

Many nieces and nephews  .

We love you always George.

Home at last to Cape Breton. Two thumbs up!

Donations appreciated to the Canadian Cancer Foundation.

 

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Passing of George Fraser

GEORGE THOMAS FRASER
MCIT,OMM,CD,LCDR,RCN(RETIRED)
Brighton Ont.
Born Alder point N.S
June 15 1934 Passed July 18 2011
Leaving home at the age of 14 with only enough money to get to Toronto he joined the Merchant ships sailing the great lakes.
Saving his money he bought his own truck to haul wood and rock at 16, and began a trucking business. He explained that was one of his prouder moments to own his own business.
Moving on quickly he joined the Royal Canadian Navy and began a career as a seamen rising to the rank of Lieutenant Commander in a 28 year career with his wife Carmen by his side. Twenty eight moves in twenty eight years.
Retiring from the military still a young man, George quickly was employed again .This time in his second love, the sports industry. Landing a job with the Canadian Games, as the Managing Director. Traveling from Vancouver to New Brunswick to carry out his role. Living in New Brunswick landed George a job with the trucking industry with Brookville transport, as their director of safety. Something that George seemed to have a great passion for! Safety and trucks.
This new job made George a shoe in for the insurance industry and soon he was working for Boreal insurance as there loss prevention manager for the trucking end of things. Forced to retire at 65 he decided to go on alone and started FCA ( Fraser Consulting Agency) . He became a leader in the trucking industry for loss prevention and trucking safety.
Working closely with quite a few trucking companies George began to work solely for Sharp Transportation and there owner and close friend Shawn Baird .
Able to work from home George was able to research and write many books on family history, his love for family and his roots. Also writing a book on Alder Point Nova Scotia. Cape Breton Island his first love, and where he longed to be. As if he was not busy enough , he started and maintained a blog called Cape Breton news which gave everyone a chance to stay in touch with what was going on back home.
He was a very busy man right up till the very end.
I’m sure where ever he may be now he is having a cup of boiled tea and lobster tail.
Pre-deceased by, Mother Viola Father Simon.
Survived by his wife of 56 years Carmen (Mcneil) Fraser
Sisters, Shirley Cahill, Mina MacLennan, Judy Macready, Ginny Laffin, Marilyn Broderick , Eleanor Shaw.
Brothers Simon and Derrick.
Many nieces and nephews .
We love you always George.
Home at last to Cape Breton. Two thumbs up!
Donations appreciated to the Canadian Cancer Foundation.

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

About 3 million people visit the Taj Mahal every year. This blog was viewed about 32,000 times in 2010. If it were the Taj Mahal, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

In 2010, there were 478 new posts, not bad for the first year! There were 838 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 70mb. That’s about 2 pictures per day.

The busiest day of the year was December 6th with 492 views. The most popular post that day was KERCHIEFS, VEILS AND HIJABS.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were mail.live.com, mail.yahoo.com, en.wordpress.com, facebook.com, and alphainventions.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for hijab, green tomato chow chow, meat pie, cape breton post obituaries, and unemployment.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

KERCHIEFS, VEILS AND HIJABS July 2010

2

GREEN TOMATO CHOW (CHOW – CHOW) August 2010
11 comments

3

GLACE BAY – CAPE BRETON August 2010

4

ESKIMO WOMAN ARRIVES AT CAPE DAUPHIN – 1820 November 2010
3 comments

5

CAPE BRETON TOURTIERE – MEAT PIE November 2010

MEANING OF NAMES

fraser Name Meaning and History

Fraser Coat of Arms – “I am Ready”

 

Fraser

Scottish: of uncertain origin. The earliest recorded forms of this family name, dating from the mid-12th century, are de Fresel, de Friselle, and de Freseliere. These appear to be Norman, but there is no place in France with a name answering to them. It is possible, therefore, that they represent a Gaelic name corrupted beyond recognition by an Anglo-Norman scribe. The modern Gaelic form is Friseal, sometimes Anglicized as Frizzell. The surname Fraser is also borne by Jews, in which case it represents an Americanized form of one or more like-sounding Jewish surnames.
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

George

English: from Old French, from Latin Georgius, from Greek Georgios (from georgos farmer, a compound of ge earth + ergein to work). This was the name of several early saints, including the shadowy figure who is now the patron of England (as well as of Germany and Portugal). Gibbon identified him with a Cappadocian leader of this name, but this cannot be right. If the saint existed at all, he was perhaps martyred in Palestine in the persecutions instigated by the Emperor Diocletian at the beginning of the 4th century. The popular legend in which the hero slays a dragon is a medieval Italian invention. He was for a long time a more important saint in the Orthodox Church than in the West, and the name was not much used in England during the Middle Ages, even after St George came to be regarded as the patron of England in the 14th century. The real impulse for its popularity was the accession of the first king of England of this name, who came from Germany in 1714 and brought many German retainers with him. It has been one of the most popular English male names ever since. Cognates: Irish Gaelic: Seoirse. Scottish Gaelic: Seòras, Deòrsa. Welsh: Siôr, Sior(y)s. French: Georges. Provençal: Jori. Italian: Giorgio. Spanish, Portuguese: Jorge. Catalan: Jordi. Basque: Gorka. German: Georg; Jörg (dialectal); Jürgen (Low German in origin). Dutch, Frisian: Joris, Joren, Jurg. Danish: Jørgen, Jørn. Swedish: Göran, Jöran, Jörgen, Örjan. Finnish: Yrjö. Russian: Georgi, Yuri, Yegor. Polish: Jerzy. Czech: Jirí. Hungarian: György. Romanian: Gheorghe, Iorghu. See also Yorick.

Pet forms: English: Georgie, Geordie. Russian: Goga, Gora, Gorya. Polish: Jurek.

Feminine forms: English: Georgia, Georgina, Georgette. Scottish Gaelic: Seòrdag.

OBITS – JUN 25, 2010

Obituaries

Obituaries for June 25th, 2010

Baby Jaxson Berrette

Published June 25th, 2010

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Thomas ‘Tommy’ MacNeil

Published June 25th, 2010

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Katherine ‘Kaye’ MacQueen

Published June 25th, 2010

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Carolyn McIntyre

Published June 25th, 2010

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Daniel Bruno Halliday

Published June 25th, 2010

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Gordon ‘Mort’ Cooper

Published June 25th, 2010

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Mary Di Sano

Published June 25th, 2010

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Donald Maxwell Ryan

Published June 25th, 2010

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SWORD FISHING

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Simon & Russel Fraser cleaning Swordfish (Pic contributed by Marilyn Broderick)

Sword Fishing – Of all the recreational activities we participated in, sword fishing held my attention and was without question the most enjoyable. I guess I got seasick every day I went out but I still loved it. I sailed for six years in the Merchant Navy on the Coast and the Great Lakes and spent twenty-eight years in the Royal Canadian Navy and got seasick almost every time I went to sea or at least uncomfortable if not violently sick but it did not sway me from enjoying every minute of going to sea. Uncle Willie always asked for me to come along with him, Daddy, Russell and whoever else was crewing with them that season usually Jackie MacLean from Point Aconi, or Joe Campbell, or Red Alec MacLellan or Paul Palm from Reading, PA if he and Florence were home for the summer. In the early days in 1944, 1945 and 1946 Grampa Fraser used to come with us. It was great having him because he was a good cook and knew absolutely everyone Down North.  I enjoyed my chores of keeping the foc’sle clean, and helping with the food preparation and clean up and generally tidying up from stem to stern – I was everyone’s gopher but enjoyed it. Uncle Willie was in the Navy in the First World War and was a stickler for neatness and cleanliness aboard at all times with all ropes having to be coiled perfectly and never a bumper hanging over the side if we were underway.  To this day I cringe when I see a boat entering or leaving harbour with bumpers hanging over the side. The sword fishing season started late in July and could run into September. The fish followed the warm water currents coming up along the coast. We would watch the papers and listen to the news of sword fish caught off Louisbourg for example. We would then head out for there looking for sword fish and at night visit such quaint and friendly ports such as Louisbourg, Little Lorraine, Main-a-Dieu, Port Morien, and Glace Bay. This would last for a few weeks and the fish would move along to an area off Sydney, Bras d’Or gut and off towards Smokey. This would allow us a few days fishing out of the gut. The sword fish soon moved following the warmer water to the area off  Cape Smokey, along to St. Paul’s Island and as far west as Cape St. Lawrence. On occasion we would anchor overnight in the Bay St. Lawrence area off Fraser’s Beach where ironically my father and uncles and grand-father John R. were born and farmed and fished. We of course normally over-nighted in Ingonish or Dingwall. I enjoyed both places because in Ingonish we tied up at MacKinnon’s wharf and they had a small grocery outlet there manned by the prettiest girl I had seen in my life – she was a MacKinnon. I was in love and went to great measures to find excuses to visit the store. She was in her twenties and I was eleven or twelve at the time – but looking at her move around the store caused me to have a wonderful feeling. She had a brother who was a boxer and I enjoyed talking to him. He thought I was interested in talking boxing with him and I was but I was there for other reasons too. Dingwall was great because the Gypsum Boats were in there loading gypsum and once tied up alongside I immediately launched our dory and went across to where the ships were loading and ferried crew members across the harbour to the couple of stores on the south side. For this I charged five cents each sailor. Well, sailors being sailors the world over would give you the change they had in their pockets so I made a killing when in Dingwall.

         

          One of the few times I got into trouble at school was related to sword fishing. Often sword fishing didn’t end until mid-September or later which made me late for the beginning of the school year. One year I returned late and it was the first encounter I had with Adrian MacNeil the new principal. He was from Glace Bay, worked in the Pit to get through school and had boxed some – I liked him. The school had hired Helen Wallace from Florence as a first year teacher and she was standing in the doorway ringing the bell as I entered. I was only about thirteen at the time and she a teenager not much older than me having not yet gone to “Normal School” in Truro. She stood her ground in the door and I brushed by her and didn’t make any real effort to avoid her ample breasts as I passed through the door. She smiled as I entered but Adrian was standing in the adjoining doorway and motioned to me to come see him. I went with him and as we used to say in the Navy, “he tore a strip off me.” Sufficient to say I was chastised sufficiently and told what his expectations of me were in no uncertain terms. Strangely he did not refer to the incident but just told me he was in charge and that I should keep that in mind and conduct myself accordingly. Nonetheless, I always liked him and we got along famously after that encounter which of course was brought about by my misadventure. Many years later I saw Helen at a Wrestling Match in Ottawa and we had a good laugh about the incident.

 

Another incident which resulted in my being tossed out of school one afternoon was as follows. Actually it was me and Danny MacGrath who got tossed. I can’t recall whether we had double desks or whether our desks were close to each other or not. In any event the night before an older lady was visiting and having a cup of tea with my mother and when she left it was pitch black dark out as only it could be in Alder Point before street lighting and no moon. Shortly after she left the house, I took off for Grampa’s place along the foot path through the field. In the process of running over to Grampa’s I ran arse over tea kettle over top of this lady who was squatted down on the path relieving herself. I picked myself up and said I was sorry and all she did was say, “oh it’s you Georgie.” She kept on about her business and I could hear the whiz splashing against the foot path. It was this yarn that I told to Danny and we both collapsed with laughter to the point that it became uncontrollable. It was then that Mrs. Johnston approached us and invited us to stand up and share with the class our joke. The lady in question had two children sitting there in class with us so there was no way this would happen but each time we were asked we started to laugh even louder. This went on until Mrs. Johnston lost her patience and took one ear of each of us and marched us to the door and told us to come back when we were prepared to share the joke. We sat on the ground at the back of the school and laughed ourselves silly. Finally Mr. Ranny Rasmussen who was the janitor came out and asked what the problem was and we told him the story. He laughed as well and Danny and I went home. Mr. Rasmussen must have shared this with the teacher because next day it was not mentioned and she solved it by separating our desk seats.

 

          We while sword fishing off Ingonish and Neil’s Harbour had two interesting experiences. One evening we were heading to Ingonish and Daddy who was aloft yelled down that there was a big buck deer just ahead of us on his way out to sea. We got alongside him and tied him up and got him aboard. There was a lively discussion as you can imagine between Willie R. my father and Russell about whether we should kill him or let him go. In any case the season was not yet open so we took him ashore and let him go. Another occasion, we came across two extremely large bald eagles in the water alive but locked together by their enormous claws. We took them aboard and in to Ingonish and up to the National Park where I imagine they got them apart and freed them.

HOME REMEDIES

 

 Growing up in Alder Point in the 1940’s if I recall correctly there seemed to be three levels of sickness. The first level was you got sick from some virus or other were bedridden, took medication either prescribed or home remedy concoction and got better after seven to 10 days. The second level was more serious and normally required either a visit to the doctor’s office or a visit from the doctor, you were confined to bed for a period of days and eventually recovered. The third level a much more serious level, you were either hospitalized or confined to your bed, went into a coma and died especially if you were elderly. You rarely heard of being sent to a specialist or going to Halifax or flying you some place for treatment. You received what was available by way of medical attention and you either got better or were buried with a blessing and a minimum of ceremony. You were normally waked at home and visited by many relatives and friends. These wakes were all night vigils where you were obliged to ‘baby sit’ the dearly departed.

     We had the benefit of Dr. Brittan from Bras d’Or who visited weekly and delivered Rawleigh’s Products. The gentleman was not a real doctor but that is what we called him. He was an orator of note and once an audience was available stood in the middle of the floor and talked politics until interrupted. He had beautiful horses and harness and a sleigh in winter and a wagon in summer both were decorated with fancy lettering and designs – beautiful to look at.

The nearest hospital was Harbour View in Sydney Mines – a long distance away in the middle of winter with the roads blocked with snow and no reliable transportation available except for a horse and sleigh. As a result most people relied upon neighbours and home remedies that were readily available from the older people who swore by the remedies described below:

 

  • Midwives were available to assist in the birth of a child and for daily visits after the birth. Mrs. Annie Devoe, Edie Mae Fraser, Bertha O’Shea and Zenobie Theriault, I recall as some of the angels that visited expectant and nursing mothers and walked the roads in all hours and in all kinds of weather assisting folks for very little compensation if any.
  • We had locally produced cod liver oil to prevent coughing. ‘It was foul.’ Foul smelling and foul tasting. To take it you had to have a candy handy.
  • Mare’s milk was said to cure whooping cough.
  • Balsam buds were stewed in water and used as a cough medicine.
  • To get rid of warts people rubbed the wart with a piece of meat and then buried the meat. When the meat rotted your warts were gone.
  • People smoked tobacco in the belief it prevented tooth decay.
  • Balsam from trees was used on cuts to heal them and prevent the wound becoming infected.
  • Lard and mustard was rubbed on the chest to help cure a cold.
  • Rawleigh’s ointment was used to rub on your chest, was put on wounds and sores and even swallowed for a sore throat.
  • Sheep manure (if you could get it in Alder Point) was boiled and drank as a tea to cure measles.
  • People drank boiled blackberry root or cherry bark for diarrhea.
  • Ground juniper bark was used to treat boils.
  • Pneumonia was cured by rubbing turpentine on the chest and covering the chest with black wool.
  • Turpentine could be used to get rid of worms: a drop or two mixed with a teaspoon of sugar taken for a week would expel worms.
  • People used a roasted onion covered in cloth placed on the ear which was said to cure an earache.
  • You could cure or sooth an earache by blowing hot tobacco smoke into the ear.
  • Raw potatoes and nutmeg were cures for arthritis.
  • Tea from birch bark mixed with sugar or syrup cured asthma or a cold.
  • Headaches could be cured by putting sliced potatoes in a cheese cloth and wrapping it around the head.
  • Sulfur and molasses was used for “the itch” – it tasted awful.
  • Garlic – healing infections and for clear skin.
  • Rose water for acne.
  • Senna leaves were used as a laxative.
  • Bread poultice for boils and carbuncles.
  • Mustard baths for feet to cure a cold.
  • Flannel cloths with a poultice of lard laid on the chest for colds.
  • Melted ointment poured into ear for earache
  • People used kerosene to get rid of head lice.
  • Linseed oil was used for massage, facial cream and for constipation.
  • Passion fruit used in teas as a stimulant with calming properties.
  • Poultices were used to cure a variety of ailments:
    • A mixture of bread and milk was used to draw out the infection of a wound or boil;
    • Bran was dampened with water and heated, a person with pneumonia would leave this poultice on until it became cold at which time it was replaced;
    • Raw grated beets were used as a poultice for blood poisoning.
  • If you were attacked by scarlet fever, tuberculosis or smallpox for example you and your home would be quarantined to prevent the spread of the disease. It was so restrictive that even the dead were passed out through the window in order to prevent the spread of the disease.

 

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Rawleigh Medicated Ointment

 

Then there was Rawleigh Medicated Ointment concentrated with ingredients such as camphor, menthol, and oil of eucalyptus. Used for blisters, boils, chapped hands, chicken pox (to stop itching), insect bites, hives, sore muscles (used as a massage ointment), pierced ears (to prevent soreness and infection), prickly heat rashes, rheumatism, neuropathy (tingling in the feet) sciatica,  and sinus problems.

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 Rawleight Antiseptic Ointment

 

Our mothers used this for just about anything that ailed us. And not only that but all these years later it is still on the market and being sold 5 oz container for $6.50.

 

 

More Cures (Provided by Norma Day)

Tape this inside medicine cabinet

Did You Know That? Drinking two glasses of Gatorade can relieve headache
pain almost immediately — without the unpleasant side effects caused by
traditional “pain relievers.”

   Did you know that Colgate toothpaste makes an excellent salve for burns?

   Before you head to the drugstore for a high-priced inhaler filled with
mysterious chemicals, try chewing on a couple of curiously strong Altoids
peppermints. They’ll clear up your stuffed nose.

   Achy muscles from a bout of the flu? Mix 1 Tablespoon of horseradish in 1
cup of olive oil. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes, then apply it as amassage oil, for instant relief for aching muscles.

   Sore throat? Just mix 1/4 cup of vinegar with 1/4 cup of honey and take 1
tablespoon six times a day. The vinegar kills the bacteria.

   Cure urinary tract infections with Alka-Seltzer.  Just dissolve two tablets
in a glass of water and drink it at the onset of the symptoms.  Alka-Seltzer
begins eliminating urinary tract infections almost instantly — even though the
product was never advertised for this use. ( Note : Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold
Medicine is not the same..and contains aspirin, which can cause stomach
bleeding if you have ulcers.)

   Honey remedy for skin blemishes … Cover the blemish with a dab of honey
and place a Band-Aid over it. Honey kills the bacteria, keeps the skin sterile,
and speeds healing. Works overnight.

   Listerine therapy for toenail fungus … Get rid of unsightly toenail fungus
by soaking your toes in Listerine mouthwash. The powerful antiseptic leaves your
toenails looking healthy again.

   Easy eyeglass protection … To prevent the screws in eyeglasses from
loosening, apply a small drop of Maybelline Crystal Clear nail polish to the
threads of the screws before tightening them.

   Coca-Cola cure for rust … Forget those expensive rust removers. Just
saturate an abrasive sponge with Coca Cola and scrub the rust stain. The
phosphoric acid in the coke is what gets the job done.

   Cleaning liquid that doubles as bug killer … If menacing bees, wasps,
hornets, or yellow jackets get in your home and you can’t find the insecticide,

   Smart splinter remover …just pour a drop of Elmer’s Glue-All over the
splinter, let dry, and peel the dried glue off the skin. The splinter sticks to
the dried glue.

   Hunt’s tomato paste boil cure ….cover the boil with Hunt’s tomato paste as
a compress. The acids from the tomatoes soothe the pain and bring the boil to a
head.

   Balm for broken blisters …To disinfect a broken blister, dab on a few
drops of Listerine … a powerful antiseptic.

   Heinz vinegar to heal bruises … Soak a cotton ball in white vinegar and
apply it to the bruise for 1 hour. The vinegar reduces the blueness and speeds
up the healing process.

   Kills fleas instantly . Dawn dish washing liquid does the trick. Add a few
drops to your dog’s bath and shampoo the animal thoroughly. Rinse well to avoid
skin irritations. Goodbye fleas.

   Rainy day cure for dog odor … Next time your dog comes in from the rain,
simply wipe down the animal with Bounce or any dryer sheet, instantly making
your dog smell springtime fresh.

   Eliminate ear mites …. All it takes is a few drops of Wesson corn oil in
your cat’s ear.  Massage it in, then clean with a cotton ball.  Repeat daily
for 3 days. The oil soothes the cat’s skin, smothers the mites, and accelerates
healing.

   Quaker Oats for fast pain relief ….It’s not for breakfast anymore!  Mix 2
cups of Quaker Oats and 1 cup of water in a bowl and warm in the microwave for
1 minute, cool slightly, and apply the mixture to your hands for soothing
relief from arthritis pain.

   Happiness keeps you Sweet,
   Trials keep you strong,
   Sorrows keep you Human,
   Failures keep you Humble,
   Success keeps you Glowing,
   But only God keeps you going!